It's one of the paradoxes of blogging that most every blogger (including myself) is sharing what they know right now (let's quietly ignore those who blog purely for traffic and visibility). Since everyone is learning, this can result in poor or misleading information being shared just as much as good information. Keep this in mind as you read any blog - how experienced is the writer and how well do they really know what they're talking about.

I'm just as flawed as other bloggers, so you should feel encouraged to check my ideas for yourself. Keep the date in mind as well - in our fast moving field, even good ideas can become obsolete.

Killing the utility class with relocation

Saturday, January 20 2018 code-gardening

Sometimes you’ll find a method on your utility class that’s only used once - or only from a single consuming class. This frequently happens when a developer genuinely believes the method will be generally useful and should be available for reuse, but is wrong.

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Sharpen The Saw #25

Monday, January 15 2018 sharpen-the-saw

In this issue from February 2017: debugging in Visual Studio; a monster of a markdown editor; four ways to deal with bossy people at work; how your battery can be used to track you online; a programming font with ligatures; and why Human Driven Development is important.

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Killing the utility class with consolidation

Saturday, January 13 2018 code-gardening

Sometimes your utility class will contain methods that smell strongly of feature envy, prompting you to relocate them onto an existing class. This is a much simpler cleanup than introducing a semantic type.

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Killing the utility class with semantic types

Saturday, January 06 2018 code-gardening

Following on from our discussion on extension methods, another technique you can use when eliminating the dumping ground of your utility class is the extraction of buried semantic types. This is possible when you find a set of closely related methods with linked semantics.

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Sharpen The Saw #24

Monday, January 01 2018 sharpen-the-saw

In this issue from January 2017: A naming standard for unit tests; Scott Hanselman on everything you ought to know in 2017; Being mindful of your code; a hi-tech credit card; deliberate practice is more complex than 10k hours; and Joel Spolsky suggests developers are writing the future.

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Recent posts

Coverage History with Psake  18 Nov 2017
Sharpen The Saw #19  13 Nov 2017
Tracking time with Psake  11 Nov 2017
Sharpen The Saw #18  06 Nov 2017
The day my Psake build broke  04 Nov 2017
Sharpen The Saw #17  30 Oct 2017
NuGet, .NET Core and Psake  28 Oct 2017
Sharpen The Saw #16  23 Oct 2017
.NET Core with Psake  21 Oct 2017
Sharpen The Saw #15  16 Oct 2017